A thought on education

As voters across New York State head to the polls to approve or reject their school district’s budget, we thought it would be appropriate to share some freshly released data on education spending. According to Congressional Quarterly’s just released 2016 State Rankings, New York had the ninth lowest teacher/pupil ratio in the nation as of the 2014 school year. New York’s ratio of 13 students per teacher is significantly better than California’s, the worst state on the list – at 24.3 students per teacher. Not surprisingly, New York ranked first in teacher salary, coming in at an average of $77,628, $25,000 more than the 25th ranked state. Despite the low teacher/pupil ratio, and high salaries, New York remains toward the middle or bottom of the pack in reading and math proficiency (CQ ranked 4th and 8th grade students for the 2015 testing year). Adding to the bad news, our state ranked 39th in public high school graduation rates for the 2013 school year, at just 76.8 percent -well below the nationwide average of 81.4 percent. We also ranked near the top in both state and local government education expenditures and per capita state and local government spending, coming in at 3rd and 5th respectively.

So, what does all this mean? It is our belief that the status quo is not working, and these numbers bear that out. The time has long since passed for New York to stop throwing more and more money at education without seeing better results. In our mind, this only highlights the need for elected officials to remain committed to a strong Property Tax Cap and resist calls to weaken it. The tax cap is working, now we need to pass the accompanying mandate relief and curriculum enhancements to ensure local governments remain solvent and our students are adequately prepared for the job opportunities that will be available to them. If you’re looking for proof that the combination of a tax cap and a strong commitment to higher standards equals results, look no further than our neighbors in Massachusetts. The Bay State, which enacted a property tax cap in 1980, three decades before New York, and led the way on higher standards, ranks at or near the top in virtually every CQ category. New York should join Massachusetts as an educational leader and not succumb to the voices fighting to maintain the status quo. One of the best and easiest decisions we believe state policymakers can make to improve our state’s education rankings is to provide additional funding and resources to innovative public education models like P-TECH and charter schools.

If the P-TECH program is not something you are familiar with, we encourage you to visit their website to learn more. You can also go to www.bcnys.org and search P-TECH for additional resources and information on this innovative and demonstrably successful education alternative, and read a FAQ for employers.