PPI Series: Common Core Opposition Is Largely Based on Misconceptions and Testing Worries; Public Support for High Standards Is Strong

PPI Common Core: Here to Stay?

Part thirteen of an ongoing series on higher standards in New York State

Common Core polls are in and out of the news, and some reporters say that a majority of the public opposes the Common Core.  But a closer look at the polls tells a different story.  Whether Americans say they oppose the Common Core depends not only on how the questions are worded, but also on how well respondents understand what the standards are and what they are used for.  Polls that describe various attributes of the standards without using the name “Common Core” find high levels of support:

  • Seventy-nine percent of voters believe we should create high-quality academic standards or goals in English and math, and allow community to develop their own curricula. (Center for American Progress)
  • Ninety percent agree that the nation should raise academic standards to compete with other countries. (Center for American Progress)
  • The majority of Americans support adoption of “a set of education standards for English and math that have been set to internationally competitive levels and would be used in every state for students in grades K through 12.” (Wall Street Journal)
  • Only 16 percent oppose the following statement: “States have been deciding whether or not to use standards … that are the same across states” and that “will be used to hold public schools accountable for their performance.” (Education Next)

Nationally, most of those who say they are opposed turn out to have misconceptions about the Common Core.  According to multiple polls, large percentages of the public mistakenly believe:

  • that the Common Core standards were federally mandated;
  • that they were developed by the U.S. Department of Education; and
  • that they prescribe a national curriculum or limit what local teachers are allowed to teach.

At the state level, the New York Common Core Task Force found that “even vocal opponents of the Common Core have noted that although they may not support the implementation of and assessments related to the Common Core, they are in favor of high standards for students and accountability for schools and districts.”  So next time someone tells you he or she is against the Common Core, it might be worth asking a slightly different question.

Please click here to read part eleven in this ongoing series.

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