IBM CEO urges focus on “new collar” jobs

Ginni Rommety, the CEO of IBM (a member of The Business Council) is out with a new opinion piece in the USA Today urging U.S. policy makers to focus on policy decisions that will help prepare today’s youth for tomorrow’s jobs. In the piece, which you can read in full here, Ms. Rometty specifically cites the P-TECH model as one to follow. We here at The Business Council have made no secret of our affinity for this program. If you’re unfamiliar, here is Ms. Rommety’s decription:

“But in many other cases, new collar jobs may not require a traditional college degree. In fact, at a number of IBM’s locations spread across the United States, as many as one-third of employees don’t have a four-year degree. What matters most is that these employees – with jobs such as cloud computing technicians and services delivery specialists – have relevant skills, often obtained through vocational training.

Indeed, skills matter for all of these new positions, even if they are not always acquired in traditional ways. That is why IBM designed a new educational model that many other companies have embraced – six-year public high schools combining a relevant traditional curriculum with necessary skills from community colleges, mentoring and real-world job experience. The first of these schools – called Pathways in Technology Early College High School, or P-TECH – opened five years ago in Brooklyn. It has achieved graduation rates and successful job placement that rival elite private schools, with 35% of students from the first class graduating one to two years ahead of schedule with both high school diplomas and two-year college degrees.

There will soon be 100 schools of this kind. Governors and mayors from across the political spectrum have become champions for this new approach, and at IBM, we have committed to work with states to open at least 20 more P-TECH schools in the next year.”

Ms. Rommety closes by saying that the onus should not fall on lawmakers alone. It is incumbent on stakeholders from across the public and private spectrum to work on developing curriculum and strategies that harness the potential of these “new collar” jobs and ensure our children and grandchildren acquire the skills necessary to fill these needs