Monthly Archives: January 2017

Hammond gets it right

The Empire Center’s Bill Hammond has a terrific OpEd in today’s NY Post that echoes a message we’ve been saying for years: mainly, that New York has a problem with health taxes. From the OpEd:

“The habit hooked the state government 20 years ago this month, when the Health Care Reform Act took effect…

Over the 12 years from 2000 through 2011, lawmakers either hiked the HCRA taxes or created new ones 14 times — causing annual receipts to almost triple. The addiction had taken hold.

Including the nation’s heaviest state tax on cigarettes, HCRA now brings in $5.5 billion per year, making it the third-largest tax in the nation’s highest-taxed state.

Insidiously, the surcharges on health insurance are collected in ways that hide them from public view. Yet they add as much as 6.2 percent to a typical New York City resident’s insurance costs, compounding the pain of high premiums and deductibles.

One of the surcharges, known as the “covered lives assessment,” varies wildly from one part of the state to another. In 2016, it ranged from $10.24 per year in the Utica-Watertown region to $202.82 in New York City, a difference of 1,880 percent.”

The OpEd goes on from there, and we encourage to read it in full: http://nypost.com/2017/01/12/new-york-is-addicted-to-health-taxes/.

The Business Council will release our own legislative agenda next week, and you can be sure we will have more to say on HCRA when we do.

Gordon speaks out on Indian Point closure

Marsha Gordon, president and CEO of The Business Council of Westchester, and member of our board, wrote an excellent OpEd in the Journal News which highlights the impact of the impending closure of Indian Point Energy Center and recognizes the plant’s owner, Entergy, for their significant contributions to the community.

From the OpEd:

“As we have long stated, the power generated at Indian Point has played a direct role in stabilizing electricity costs in Westchester and the State of New York.  We have repeatedly called for the plants to be relicensed, a process that has been unnecessarily dragged out for 15 years and counting.  We are disappointed that this lack of action, coupled with the related massive legal costs, has contributed to the decision to shut down the facility.

We recognize that for some members of the community and a number of elected officials, the announcement is good news. Unfortunately, the shutdown poses an entirely new set of questions with no certain answers, including the loss of nearly 1,000 high-paying private-sector jobs and massive tax losses to the local community and school district.

Gov. Cuomo has repeatedly called for the plant’s closure.  We wait to learn how he intends to deal with the prospect of increased electric rates, the reliability of electric supply for Westchester, the Hudson Valley region and New York City, and the myriad of environmental and other issues the shutdown inevitably will bring.

We thank Entergy for its generosity and support of countless community groups, non-profit organizations and families across the area.  In short, Entergy has consistently displayed the best of corporate citizenship.”

We whole-heartedly agree with the sentiments expressed by Ms. Gordon. Entergy is a longtime and valued member of our own organization, and we look forward to continuing that relationship.

In response to news of the closure, Entergy sent the following message to shareholders, we encourage you to click the link and read it: http://www.bcnys.org/inside/energy/2017/Entergy-Message-to-Stakeholders-Indian-Point.pdf.