Category Archives: Telecommunications

Cornell Tech Announces $50-Million Naming Gift for Verizon Executive Education Center

Cornell Tech today announced a $50-million gift from Business Council member Verizon for the development of one of the innovative aspects of its Roosevelt Island campus, the Verizon Executive Education Center.

The center will be part of the first phase of the campus, which began construction last month and is due to open in the summer of 2017. When fully completed, the campus will include two million square feet of state-of-the-art buildings, more than two acres of open space, and will be home to more than 2,000 graduate students and nearly 280 faculty and staff.

“This is a transformative gift that will help enormously to advance our mission of bringing academia and industry together,” said Cornell University President David J. Skorton. “The campus will welcome everyone interested in using technology to advance the economy and to make the world a better place, and the Verizon Executive Education Center will be at the center of it.”

Cornell Tech is a revolutionary model for graduate education that fuses technology with business and creative thinking. Cornell Tech brings together like-minded faculty, business leaders, tech entrepreneurs and students in a catalytic environment to produce visionary ideas grounded in significant needs that will reinvent the way we live.

Cornell Tech’s temporary campus has been up and running at Google’s Chelsea building in New York City since 2012, with a growing world-class faculty, master’s and PhD students, and postdocs who work with tech-oriented organizations and companies and on their own startups.

“Our donation to Cornell Tech is an investment in the future and fits perfectly with our mission to use communications technologies to solve big challenges and make people’s lives better,” said Verizon Chairman and CEO Lowell McAdam. “The Verizon Executive Education Center will be a magnet for developers, entrepreneurs, educators and innovators across all industries, building on the great talent and creativity we already have in the tech sector in New York City.”

In addition to the Verizon Executive Education Center, the first phase will include the First Academic Building with an open plan and collaborative work spaces, taking its cue from the tech world. It is designed to be among the largest net-zero energy buildings in the United States, with all of its power generated on campus. A corporate co-location building will also be located on campus. The co-location building will fuse academia and industry by providing space for established tech companies and startups to locate on campus. A residential building will be constructed for faculty, staff and students to ensure the campus is active 24/7.

To read the complete announcement from Cornell Tech, please click here.

Verizon’s total green energy investments in New York exceed $60 Million with new Long Island solar project

Business Council member Verizon has begun work on the installation of a new solar energy system to provide power to Verizon’s Long Island headquarters complex in Garden City. The new solar project will place more than 7,000 SunPower solar panels on the roof of Verizon’s building which already generates 6 million kilowatt hours of green energy annually from a fuel-cell system built in 2005.

The Garden City solar project is expected to be completed and operational by the end of this year. It is one of Verizon’s many on-site green energy projects in the New York City area: Fuel cells at five New York City telecommunications-switching locations (one each in Staten Island and Queens, and three in Brooklyn) and at a data center in Elmsford in Westchester County. Altogether, Verizon has invested more than $60 million in green energy in New York.

Upon completion of the new Long Island solar project, Verizon will operate more than 6.7 megawatts of green energy systems in the state. The combined fuel cell and solar energy systems will produce more than 40 million kilowatt hours of green energy annually. Verizon’s total green energy efforts in New York are expected to offset more than 4,600 metric tons of carbon dioxide annually, or the equivalent of powering more than 3,000 homes annually.

remote areas in the western United States to help power a portion of the nation’s largest and most reliable wireless network.

All of Verizon’s energy-efficiency strategies support the company’s ultimate goal of cutting its carbon intensity – carbon emissions produced per terabyte of data flowing through Verizon’s global wired and domestic wireless networks – in half by 2020.

For more information, please visit the Verizon News Center.

Verizon challenges middle and high school students to develop innovative apps

Business Council member Verizon is once again calling on middle school and high school students to gather their teams, dream up ideas, and create concepts for mobile apps that could solve problems in their schools and communities.

The first two Verizon Innovative App Challenges have encouraged thousands of students to develop an interest in science, technology, engineering and math, the so-called STEM subjects, and have awarded cash grants totaling $340,000 – and 130 new tablets, courtesy of Samsung Telecommunications America – to winning teams. Verizon is extending the program as part of its commitment to the Obama administration’s ConnectED initiative, to which the company has pledged up to $100 million in cash and in-kind contributions over the next three years.

This year’s program will name eight teams Best in Nation and reward them with cash grants of $20,000 each and new Samsung tablets for each team member. The deadline for submission is Nov. 24, and the winners will be named in January 2015.

Teams can register now and learn more about the Verizon Innovative App Challenge at (www.verizonfoundation.org/appchallenge).

Verizon’s significant investment in New York City’s fiber-optic infrastructure

VerizonVerizon announced today that is has installed almost 89 million feet or nearly 17,000 miles of fiber optic infrastructure in New York City, enough to stretch over six trips between New York and Los Angeles.

The company’s fiber infrastructure in the city includes facilities for interoffice and backbone network equipment, specialized fiber for large enterprise customers, as well its revolutionary FiOS services serving consumers and small businesses.

Unlike cable, FiOS utilizes light to transfer video and data signals all the way to a home or business, making it the highest-performing communications technology available. FiOS currently delivers download speeds as high as 500 megabits per second (Mbps) and upload speeds of up to 100 Mbps.  These speeds give customers the ability to download a 2-hour HD video in just over a minute-and-a- half and upload the average PowerPoint presentation in less than a second.

Verizon is meeting its goal to run its all-fiber telecommunications network throughout all five boroughs. “This is the largest, most-ambitious fiber-optic deployment in any U.S. city. We have invested more than $3 billion in the city alone, making it one of the most ‘fiberized’ cities on the planet,” said Kevin Service, Verizon’s president for the company’s Northeast Area.  “Our 12,000 New York City employees are proud to bring this future-proof  technology to the people of New York City.”

Service also said that the company has worked with the city confirming each annual benchmark established for upgrading its network for video service availability in the five boroughs.  As of the end of 2013, the company had completed network upgrades passing premises in  90 percent of the Bronx, 89 percent of Brooklyn, 94 percent of Manhattan, 90 percent of Queens and virtually the entirety of Staten Island — all as called for under the Cable Franchise Agreement with the city.

In addition, the company has already made FiOS available to more than 60,000 New York City public housing units.

After Superstorm Sandy, the company accelerated its plans for installing fiber-optic technology to replace cables and other infrastructure elements that were destroyed by the unprecedented flooding. In the most dramatic example, the company installed fiber-optic cables and networking equipment throughout lower Manhattan and in some of the coastal neighborhoods in Brooklyn (such as Coney Island and Sheepshead Bay) and Queens (such as Belle Harbor and Breezy Point) giving all of those areas a robust and reliable all-fiber-optic telecommunications network for years to come.

Verizon reached an agreement with the City of New York to conduct a pilot program of  “microtrenching,” which enables fiber optic cables to be installed in a way that’s less disruptive to the city’s streets and sidewalks.

Installing underground wires – such as fiber – in New York can be time consuming and disruptive to the community. It involves large excavations, backhoes and dump trucks, air and noise pollution, and it has a significant impact on the carbon footprint. Not to mention the noise and disruption. Verizon’s new approach to trenching, which was approved by the city to go from pilot to standard practice, makes it easier and more efficient to lay fiber. It involves a much thinner wire and less equipment. And it takes a third of the time to install fiber, with less disruption to the environment.

Other innovations and techniques Verizon has developed and taken advantage of in its New York City fiber deployment include the so-called Magic Wire, which seamlessly and almost invisibly adheres to moldings in compact city apartments, and a desktop optical network terminal that takes up far less space, as opposed to a larger one that is affixed to the side of a house in more suburban settings.

Read more on Verizon’s website.

Verizon invested more than $1.6 billion in New York’s and Connecticut’s wireline telecommunications infrastructure in 2013

Business Council member Verizon recently announced that the company spent $1.6 billion on fiber-optic and Internet Protocol-based networks in New York and Connecticut in 2013.  The company said that much of the money was used to replace cables and other infrastructure that was destroyed during Superstorm Sandy.

Verizon also highlighted an agreement that it reached with New York City last year to conduct a pilot program of “microtrenching,” which enables its technicians to install fiber-optic cables in a manner that is much less disruptive to streets and sidewalks.

Kevin Service, Verizon’s president for consumer and mass business in the Northeast, said, “Our network investments in New York and Connecticut provide an engine for economic growth through our aggressive wireline and wireless networks and IT deployment.  No other company is as deeply tied on a daily basis to the residents and the economy of the region as Verizon. Our advanced networks enable new businesses to grow, small businesses to percolate, give schools and educators a platform for learning, and provide families a means to connect.”

Read more about Verizon’s major wireline infrastructure programs in 2013 on Verizon’s website.

 

New area code delayed

State regulators have decided to delay making a decision on a new area code for Central and Northern New York after accepting public comments over the summer.

The state Public Service Commission will not rule on the proposed second area code for the 315 area at their meeting this week. It is expected that the 315 area code will start to run out of new numbers in 2015.

Two options are being considered, an “overlay” that would create a second area code in the same region as 315 or splitting the existing region into two separate area codes.

A coalition of phone companies including AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon has urged the commission to vote in favor of the overlay option.

Op-ed: Firms meet wireless reality

An op-ed by Heather C. Briccetti, Esq., president and CEO of The Business Council of New York State that ran in the Albany Times Union supports the need to invest in new telecommunications infrastructure

While traditional landline service will not go away anytime soon, services such as Verizon’ Voice Link, implement new technology to provide service to areas that may be better served by it.

This technology provides relief to subscribers who face chronic service issues.  Wireless and fiber optic options will help meet future demand and is a smart investment as opposed to investing millions in updating an outdated copper infrastructure

Read the full op-ed on the Times Union website.