Tag Archives: Corning

With Lower Cost Power Corning Expands Canton Plant

Business Council member Corning Incorporated will expand its facility in Canton in St. Lawrence County creating 40 additional jobs at the site. Corning is receiving a low-cost power allocation from the New York Power Authority to support the more than $21 million capital expansion project. The firm has been allocated 2.1 megawatts (MW) of power, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced today. Corning will add a total of 30,700 square feet to accommodate additional storage and an increase in production of high-fused silica glass used by the semiconductor industry.

Patrick Jackson, Director of Corning’s Global Energy Management, said, “This allocation by NYPA will reduce Corning’s energy cost, which is a major expenditure at the Canton plant.
The Business Council advocates for lower energy costs for New York businesses.

Corning is a world leader in specialty glass and ceramics and has locations in  various parts of New York state. The company is planning to expand its Canton facility by 23,500 square feet to greatly increase production at the facility, which supplies microchips for computers, cell phones and other electronics. A 7,200-square-foot warehouse is also part of the project. Corning is planning a formal ceremony for next month to mark the start of construction on the expansion project.

The low-cost hydropower will be provided to Corning under a seven-year contract and is drawn from a block of St. Lawrence electricity known as Preservation Power. In addition to the new permanent jobs, which are already being added, the capital investments by the company are expected to support dozens of temporary construction jobs.

Corning Named 2014 ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year

Business Council member Corning Incorporated has been named an ENERGY STAR® Partner of the Year by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its strategic energy management program.

“Innovative strategies in energy management are some of the most cost-effective ways to improve the bottom line in the places we work, shop, and play,” EPA Deputy Administrator Bob Perciasepe said. “Corning’s leadership in energy management supports the well-being of American families while also fighting climate change.”

Corning was recognized for adopting a continuous energy management strategy in all of its buildings and plants. Corning is a global company, with U.S. operations consisting of nearly 50 facilities in 16 states and the District of Columbia.

“Every one of our facilities has contributed to this effort, which has lowered both our energy usage and our costs,” said Kirk Gregg, Corning’s executive vice president and chief administrative officer.  “Our approach helps us manage greenhouse gas emissions, and the money we save on energy enhances our ability to make strategic investments in Corning’s future.”

Corning’s Global Energy Management program, led by Patrick Jackson, develops and implements Corning’s energy policies. Since its launch in 2006, GEM’s management practices have saved Corning more than $328 million in cumulative energy costs.

“We’ve received significant support from leadership and an amazing effort from all of our team members and plant managers,” Jackson said. “This success has only been possible because everyone in the corporation has bought into the idea that we can be world-class when it comes to energy efficiency.”

The 2014 Partner of the Year Awards are given to a variety of organizations to recognize their contributions to reducing greenhouse gas emissions through superior energy efficiency. The award winners are selected from the 16,000 partners that participate in the ENERGY STAR program and will be recognized in Washington, D.C., on April 29, 2014.

Through 2013, with help from ENERGY STAR, American families and businesses have saved $297 billion on utility bills and prevented more than 2.1 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions.

Member News: Corning Incorporated announce major expansion of Erwin facility

JPEG Wordmark 301 BlueThis comes under the heading of good news: In a release sent out this morning, Governor Cuomo announced that Corning Incorporated will invest nearly $250 million for a 94,000 square-foot facility of its diesel plan in the Town of Erwin (Stueben County). That investment will result in the creation of 250 full-time jobs and the retention of 500 positions.

“The expansion of this facility is great news for New York – a testament to our world-class workforce and further proof of our ability to compete for global jobs and business,” Governor Cuomo said. “We are extremely pleased that Corning has decided to make a major investment to expand their capacity here in Erwin, and look forward to them growing and thriving in the region.”

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Disruptions: Where Apple and Dick Tracy may converge

DickTracyJamesBondWith Corning’s help, yet another gadget of spy movies may come to pass: Nick Bilton of The New York Times has the story:

Dick Tracy had one. As did Inspector Gadget and James Bond. A watch that doubled as a computer, two-way radio, mapping device or television.

Though such a device has been lost to science fiction comics and spy movies of the era before smartphones, the smart watch might soon become a reality, in the form of a curved glass device made by Apple.

In its headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., Apple is experimenting with wristwatch-like devices made of curved glass, according to people familiar with the company’s explorations, who spoke on the condition that they not be named because they are not allowed to publicly discuss unreleased products. Such a watch would operate on Apple’s iOS platform, two people said, and stand apart from competitors based on the company’s understanding of how such glass can curve around the human body.

Apple declined to comment on its plans. But the exploration of such a watch leaves open lots of exciting questions: If the company does release such a product, what would it look like? Would it include Siri, the voice assistant? Would it have a version of Apple’s map software, offering real-time directions to people walking down the street? Could it receive text messages? Could it monitor a user’s health or daily activity? How much will it cost? Could Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s chief executive, be wearing one right now, whispering sweet nothings to his wrist?

Such a watch could also be used to make mobile payments, with Apple’s Passbook payment software.

Although it would take Dick Tracy to find the answers to those questions, and it’s uncertain when Apple might unveil such a device, it’s clear that Apple has the technology.

Last year, Corning, the maker of the ultra-tough Gorilla Glass that is used in the iPhone, announced that it had solved the difficult engineering challenge of creating bendable glass, called Willow Glass, that can flop as easily as a piece of paper in the wind without breaking.

Pete Bocko, the chief technology officer for Corning Glass Technologies, who worked on Willow Glass, said via telephone that the company had been developing the thin, flexible glass for more than a decade, and that the technology had finally arrived.

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