Tag Archives: marcellus

Marcellus royalty payments rising rapidly

In Pennsylvania, the overall number of income tax returns showing rent and royalty income climbed by 19 percent from 2006 until 2010. For those in counties with Marcellus activity, the increase was 29 percent.  Statewide royalty income rose 61 percent from 2006 to 2010 with an increase of 119 percent in counties with Marcellus Shale drilling activity. These figures come from a recently released Allegheny Institute for Public Policy report.

“From all accounts natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale formation has been an economic boon for Pennsylvania. While the exact overall impact may be up for debate, what is not debatable is the benefit for owners of the land and/or mineral rights where wells are located,” wrote Frank Gamrat, Ph.D, author of the report.
That view has been echoed by The Business Council in its support of natural gas development in New York, particularly in the Southern Tier. “There are very few opportunities available with the same job creating potential as the exploration and development of shale gas,” said Heather Briccetti, president and CEO of The Business Council in a statement opposing the Assembly’s shale gas moratorium vote in March.

Post-Journal editorial: Hydraulic fracturing is an economic necessity

Janice L. Miller, a resident of Machias, N.Y., has been an ardent supporter of natural gas development.  Machias is located in the heart of the  Marcellus shale formation in Cattaraugus County. She wrote the following op-ed which was published in the Post-Journal (Jamestown) Sunday.

http://www.post-journal.com/page/content.detail/id/622053/Hydraulic-Fracturing-Is-An-Economic-Necessity.html

Recently, The Business Council re-iterated its strong support of shale development in New York. In response to the state Appellate Division decision to turn aside an appeal from Norse Energy Corporation that challenged the Town of Dryden’s use of it zoning laws to ban hydrofracking, The Business Council released a statement:

We have been a steadfast supporter of shale development. The economic opportunities and potential jobs created by natural gas development would bring a lasting positive impact to the region and the state, and we believe that scientific and technical reviews will prove the case for moving forward with permits in New York State. Regardless of the final court outcome on this case, we oppose statutory prohibitions on the state or local level, as contrary to sound economic, energy and environmental policy.” Heather Briccetti, president and CEO of The Business Council of New York State, Inc.

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As the rest of the nation looks for new opportunities to create jobs and lower America’s dependence on foreign sources of energy, New York is still working to create a balanced approach to shale development. After four years of extensive study, research and hearings, the state should now move forward with safe and responsible shale gas development. The State must bring to a close its review and allow the people of New York to directly benefit from America’s new energy future.

Click here to send a letter to your local legislators and state leaders in support of natural gas development.

Empire Center: The Economic Effects of Hydrofracturing on Local Economies

PPIHydrofrackingThe following report written by Diana Furchtgott-Roth and Andrew Gray forwards The Public Policy Institute of New York State’s (PPI) own 2011 study which showed once Marcellus Shale development began local, state and federal tax revenues could increase by more than $214 million in 2014.

Here is the summary from the Empire Center report that looked at economic development in Pennsylvania:
  • Pennsylvania counties with hydrofractured gas wells have performed better across economic indicators than those that have no wells.
  • The more wells a county contains, the better it performed.
  • Between 2007 and 2011, per-capita income rose by 19 percent in Pennsylvania counties with more than 200 wells, by 14 percent in counties with between 20 and 200 wells, and by 12 percent in counties with fewer than 20 wells.
  • In counties without any hydrofractured wells, income went up by only 8 percent.
  • Counties with the lowest per-capita incomes experienced the most rapid growth.
  • Counties with more than 200 wells added jobs at a 7 percent annual rate over the same time period.
  • Where there was no drilling, or only a few wells, the number of county jobs shrank by 3 percent.
  • Using the Pennsylvania data to project hydrofracking’s effect on New York counties, we find that the income of residents in the 28 New York counties above the Marcellus Shale has the potential to expand by 15 percent or more over the next four years—if the state’s moratorium is lifted.
  • Our data also suggest that had New York allowed its counties to fully exploit the Marcellus Shale, those counties would have seen income-growth rates of up to 15 percent for a given four-year period, or as much as 6 percent more than they are experiencing.

Click here to see the fill report “The Economic Effects of Hydrofracking on Local Economies.

 

The Business Council issues statement on Dryden Appellate Division decision on hydrofracking

The state Appellate Division turned aside an appeal from Norse Energy Corporation that challenged the Town of Dryden’s use of its zoning laws to ban fracking. Norse Energy argued that the ban violates the state’s supremacy to regulate the DrydenLocationoil and gas industry under the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Law, wrote Casey Seiler of the Times Union. Shortly after the decision, The Business Council released a statement.

“The Business Council’s position is unchanged. We have been a steadfast supporter of shale development. The economic opportunities and potential jobs created by natural gas development would bring a lasting positive impact to the region and the state, and we believe that scientific and technical reviews will prove the case for moving forward with permits in New York State.  Regardless of the final court outcome on this case, we oppose statutory prohibitions on the state or local level, as contrary to sound economic, energy and environmental policy.”

Heather Briccetti, president and CEO of The Business Council of New York State, Inc.

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As the rest of the nation looks for new opportunities to create jobs and lower America’s dependence on foreign sources of energy, New York is still working to create a balanced approach to shale development. After four years of extensive study, research and hearings, the state should now move forward with safe and responsible shale gas development. The State must bring to a close its review and allow the people of New York to directly benefit from America’s new energy future.

Click here to take action by sending a letter in support of natural gas development to lawmakers.

The Business Council opposes Oil and Gas Drilling Mandates bill

The Business Council released a memo Monday opposing a bill (A,3466/A.6220) submitted by State Senator Tony Avella and Assembly Majority Whip William Colton which would institute a separate series of workplace standards for oil and gas workers and their contractors.

“This bill is just another bill intended to fit into the narrative of those that oppose the expansion of natural gas and oil drilling in New York.” The Business Council has long supported responsible and safe natural gas development in New York.

Click here to read the memo in which The Business Council offers several strong objections to the bill.

Trust scientists on hydrofracking

In a letter to the Albany Times UnionSyracuse University’s Donald Siegel, professor of hydrogeology, calls on the the newspaper and New York State to not ignore the fact that 29 other states safely allow drilling for natural gas and that advocating for halting natural gas development in New York State is a means of “obstruction that political opponents use against fossil fuel development in general.”

He calls on New York State to work with scientists and the industry to pursue the technology safely in our state. Read the full letter on the Albany Times Union website.

 

Ed Rendell: Why Cuomo must seize the moment on hydrofracking

In an op-ed which appears in the Daily News today, Ed Rendell, the former governor of Pennsylvania, writes that Governor Cuomo must, well, the headline already says it. The Business Council strongly supports safe and responsible natural gas development in New York. Rendell agrees. He cites the economic windfall it has brought to his state.

Click here to read Rendell’s op-ed.

N.Y. State Health Commissioner won’t wait for studies on fracking

AP_LogoMichael Gormley, Capitol editor of the Associated Press, writes that New York’s health commissioner will make a recommendation “to the governor ‘in weeks’ on whether the state should approve hydraulic fracturing.”

Click here to read Gormley’s interesting article.

 

Take Action logo[message_box title=”Create Jobs, Strengthen the Economy. Say Yes to Natural Gas Development” color=”red”]As the rest of the nation looks for new opportunities to create jobs and lower America’s dependence on foreign sources of energy, New York is still working to create a balanced approach to shale development. After four years of extensive study, research and hearings, the state should now move forward with safe and responsible shale gas development. The State must bring to a close its review and allow the people of New York to directly benefit from America’s new energy future.

The benefits of shale energy development are undeniable. This advance in technology has created 1.75 million jobs over the past few years alone, and is expected to account for 2.5 million jobs in 2015 and 3 million jobs in 2020. Additionally, between now and 2035, shale energy development is expected to contribute more than $2.5 trillion in government revenues.

Now it is New York’s turn. Click here to tell Governor Cuomo and the Department of Conservation to move forward and make shale jobs a reality in New York. Our economy depends on it.[/message_box]